An African Thunderstorm Questions- CSEME PRO

  1. Identify the two similes used in stanza 1.

    2. Why are the clouds described as “pregnant” in stanza 2?

    3. Comment on the use of the word “stately” in line 10.

    4. Quote two consecutive words in stanza 2 that suggest that the thunderstorm might be dangerous.

    5. Explain why this thunderstorm might not be as welcome to the villagers.

    6. In line 24, alliteration is used. Write down the line and indicate the alliteration and also comment on its effectiveness.

A Contemplation Upon Flowers by Henry King

STANZA 1
Stanza one centers on the characteristics of flowers.  They are gallant, humble, etc., and they return to the earth (figuratively, they die every winter–but this isn’t revealed until later) after putting on a show. His first lesson that he learnt was to become brave and to remember the place where the flower came from, as referred to line 1, 5-6 ” Brave flowers that I could gallant it like you“ The persona wishes that he could be as brave as the flowers, who are aware of their allegiance to the earth. ” You are not proud you know your birth for your embroidered garments are from earth.” They know their place and obey the order, or cycle, of life and death. The persona wishes that he could be this way because he is the opposite, he wants to live forever. The persona wants the flowers to teach him NOT to fear death, but to accept it. Line 1 can also be identified as a literary device known as personification because brave flowers cannot gallant which only living things such as animals or humans can do. Also in line 5 and 6 can be identified as Biblical allusion another literary device because the bible in the books of John and Matthew Jesus talked about the lilies in the field where they are created and their birth place.

STANZA 2
Stanza two switches focus to the speaker:  he would rather it be always spring, so he’d never have a winter (again, so he’d never die, but this doesn’t become clear until later:  winter is often used as a symbol of death).  He wishes he could go to the earth (his grave), and look as cheerful, and smile, as the flowers do when they go to their earth. The second stanza the speaker learnt the second lesson which was to accept nature and their selves for today the flowers in the field may be beautiful and blooming but tomorrow the flowers know their beauty will not last forever where they may withered away and torn to pieces. In line 7 and 8 “You do obey your months and times, but i would have it ever spring;” metaphor can be found in the sentence.

 

STANZA 3
In stanza three, the focus on the speaker in stanza two combines with the focus on the flowers in stanza one, as the speaker asks the flowers to teach him to not fear death; to teach him that his breath may sweeten and perfume his death, as the flowers’ breath sweetens theirs . In the last stanza the poet learnt his last lesson which was to accept death as referred in line 13 and 14 ” Oh teach me to see death and not to fear, but rather take truce.” The only literary device that can be found is rhyme.

In line 17 and line 18 ” You fragrant flowers then teach me that my breath like yours may sweeten and perfumed my death.” The name was given to the poem because the poet shows that the speaker is studying the poem. This poem “A contemplation upon flowers by Henry King” is about a man who wants the flowers to teach him to become humble. The comparison of the life of a simple flower is made to the life of a human, in the sense that we both are born, we both live, and we both must die.

Majority of people fear death, but the flowers accept death with open arms and a smile. This poem by Henry King praises flowers for not only their humble lifestyles but also for their acceptance of death. Instead, the flowers taught him three lessons.

LITERARY DEVICES
. SIMILE
Stanza 1, line: The persona is wishing that he could be as brave as the flower. This implies that the persona does not think that he is brave, but a coward in the face of death.
Stanza 2, line 14: This is another comparison between the persona and the plant. The persona wishes that he could look death in the face and be cheerful, like the plant. Again, this emphasizes that he fears death.

EUPHEMISM
This phrase is a replacement for the word death. It softens death and makes it appear welcoming and pleasant.

IRONY
It is ironic that the flowers look so fresh and alive, when they are facing their very mortality, on the top of a casket. Death is a sad affair, yet the flowers are at their best when ushering people back to the earth.

PERSONIFICATION
The persona is speaking directly to the flowers and giving them human qualities, therefore, the whole poem is an example of the use of personification at its best. He even goes as far as to ask the flowers to teach him things that will allow him to acquire their qualities.

TONE
The tone of the poem is admiration, because the persona literally admires the flowers for its accepting attitude towards death.

MOOD/ ATMOSPHERE
The mood, or atmosphere of the poem is a pensive one. The persona is thinking about death, how he relates to it versus how others relate to it.

CONTRAST
A contrast in this poem is the persona’s fear of death, versus the flowers’ acceptance of it.

THEMES
Death is the overwhelming theme in this poem. The persona admires the way in which the flowers deal with death and wish to emulate it. Death is a very scary prospect for the persona.Nature is his willingness to accept nature as a worthy contrast to humans personality and approach to life. He uses the natural to highlight the failings and weaknesses of man.

Ol’ Higue by Mark McWatt

In this poem, the Ol’ Higue / soucouyant tells of her frustration with her lifestyle. She does not like the fact that she sometimes has to parade around, in the form of a fireball, without her skin at night. She explains that she has to do this in order to scare people, as well as to acquire baby blood. She explains that she would rather acquire this blood via cooked food, like every-one else. Her worst complaint is the pain of salt, as well as having to count rice grains. She exhibits some regret for her lifestyle but implies that she cannot resist a baby’s smell, as well as it’s pure blood. The ‘newness’ of the baby tempts the Ol’ Higue, and she cannot resist because she is an old woman who fears death, which can only be avoided by consuming the baby’s blood. She affirms her usefulness in the scheme of things, however, by claiming that she provides mothers with a name for their fears (this being the death of a child), as well as some-one to blame when the evil that they wish for their child, in moments of tired frustration, is realized. She implies that she will never die, so long as women keep having babies.
LITERARY DEVICES

1. SIMILE
Cane-fire has a very distinct quality. It burns very quickly and its presence is felt through it’s pungent smell. Therefore, when the Ol’ Higue compares herself to cane fire in her fireball state, it implies that she uses a lot of energy quickly, and is very visible. 
2. RHETORICAL QUESTION

•Stanza 1,line 4: This rhetorical question highlights the scant regard that the Higue has for the average person. She is thoroughly annoyed that she has to literally waste her energy on them.
•Stanza 1, line 5: This highlights the fact that, again, she is annoyed that she has to expend so much energy to obtain a few drops of baby blood.
•Stanza 1, lines 6-8: The Ol’ Higue is emphasizing the fact that regular people ingest blood too, just in a more palatable manner. She would not mind if she could ingest it in the same manner as well.
•Stanza 3, lines 22-23: At this point the Ol’ Higue is making excuses for her presence, claiming that she serves an actual purpose in the scheme of life. If a child dies of unknown causes, she can be scapegoated for it.
•Stanza 3, lines 24-25: ‘The murder inside your head’ refers to the moments, when out of pure frustration and tiredness, a mother might wish ill on her child. The Ol’ Higue is implying that, again, she can be used as a scapegoat if something unfortunate happens to the child. The mother is relieved of bearing the burden of guilt.
3. REPETITION
The repetition of the word ‘soft’ emphasizes the fact that the call of the child’s blood has captured and beguiled the Ol’ Higue’. She implies that she cannot resist that call.
4. ALLITERATION
This device emphasizes the Ol’ Higue’s dependence, even addiction, to the sweet blood of the baby.
IMPORTANT WORDS/ PHRASES

5. ‘stupidness!’
This is a distinctly Caribbean phrase that highlights frustration or scorn. Therefore, it highlights the Ol’ Higue’s frustration with her lack of self control.

6. ‘gallivanting’
This term refers to some one ‘playing around’, having fun. The Ol’ Higue is being sarcastic at this point. She is expressing displeasure at having to fly around to seek prey.

7. ‘pure blood running in new veins’
Babies are often associated with purity, this is what is emphasized here. The Ol’ Higue simply cannot resist the lure of new and pure blood.

8. ‘holding her final note for years and years, afraid of the dying hum …’
This tells us that the Ol’Higue has been living this desperate existence for a long time. It also implies that she will keep hanging on, despite her frustration. The final line confirms this point: ‘As long as it have women giving birth a poor Ol’ Higue like me can never dead’
MOOD/ ATMOSPHERE
The mood of the poem is reflective.
TONE
The tone of the poem is slightly bitter and resigned. She accepts that the cycle of her life cannot change.
THEMATIC CATEGORIZATION

Supernatural
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